Victory for Privacy: Supreme Court Says Cell Phone Location Records Protected Under Fourth Amendment

In a landmark ruling, the U.S. Supreme Court held that the Fourth Amendment protects location records generated by mobile phones. The government in Carpenter v. United States had obtained more than 6 months of location records without a warrant. EPIC filed a “friend-of-the-court” brief in…

Victory! Supreme Court Says Fourth Amendment Applies to Cell Phone Tracking

The Supreme Court handed down a landmark opinion today in Carpenter v. United States, ruling 5-4 that the Fourth Amendment protects cell phone location information. In an opinion by Chief Justice Roberts, the Court recognized that location information, collected by cell providers like Sprint, AT&T,…

Supreme Court Opens Door to Worldwide Patent Damages

The Supreme Court issued a disappointing opinion [PDF] today holding that a company could recover patent damages for lost profits overseas. The court’s reasoning could make overseas damages available in many patent cases. This will disadvantage companies that do research and development in the United…

Happy Birthday Alice: Four Years Busting Software Patents

This week marks the fourth anniversary of the Supreme Court’s decision in Alice v. CLS Bank. In Alice, the court ruled that an abstract idea does not become eligible for a patent simply by being implemented on a generic computer. Now that four years have…

The Supreme Court Says Your Expectation of Privacy Probably Shouldn’t Depend on Fine Print

The Supreme Court unanimously ruled yesterday in Byrd v. United States that the driver of a rental car could have a reasonable expectation of privacy in the car even though the rental agreement did not authorize him to drive it. We’re pleased that that the…

Supreme Court: Fourth Amendment for Lawful Driver of Vehicle Regardless of Rental Agreement

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled today that a driver in lawful possession of a rental car has a reasonable expectation of privacy regardless of a rental car agreement. The Court held in Byrd v. United States that, “the mere fact that a driver in lawful…

Supreme Court: Government’s Reading of Wiretap Act ‘Makes Little Sense’

The Supreme Court has ruled in Dahda v. United States, a case about the federal Wiretap Act and the suppression of evidence obtained under an overly broad wiretap order. A lower court permitted the evidence, relying on a novel interpretation of the Act. EPIC filed…

Supreme Court To Review Fairness of Cy Pres Awards In Class Action Settlements

The Supreme Court today granted certiorari to address for the first time whether a class action settlement that awards cy pres but provides no direct relief to class members is “fair, reasonable, and adequate.” The case, Frank v. Gaos, involves a settlement arising from Google’s…

Supreme Court Upholds Patent Office Power to Invalidate Bad Patents

In one of the most important patent decisions in years, the Supreme Court has upheld the power of the Patent Office to review and cancel issued patents. This power to take a “second look” is important because, compared to courts, administrative avenues provide a much faster…

Minnesota Supreme Court Ruling Will Help Shed Light on Police Use of Biometric Technology

A decision by the Minnesota Supreme Court on Wednesday will help the public learn more about how law enforcement use of privacy invasive biometric technology. The decision in Webster v. Hennepin County is mostly good news for the requester in the case, who sought the…