New Witness Panel Tells Congress How to Protect Consumer Data Privacy

Yesterday’s Senate Commerce Committee hearing on consumer data privacy was a welcome improvement. The last time the Committee convened around this topic, all of the witnesses were industry and corporate representatives. This time, we were happy to see witnesses from consumer advocacy groups and the…

The Google+ Bug Is More About The Cover-Up Than The Crime

Earlier this week, Google dropped a bombshell: in March, the company discovered a “bug” in its Google+ API that allowed third-party apps to access private data from its millions of users. The company confirmed that at least 500,000 people were “potentially affected.” Google’s mishandling of…

When Police Misuse Their Power to Control News Coverage, They Shouldn’t Be Allowed To Use Probable Cause As a Shield Against Claims of First Amendment Violations

Journalists face increasingly hostile conditions covering public protests, presidential rallies, corruption, and police brutality in the course of work as watchdogs over government power. A case before the U.S. Supreme Court threatens press freedoms even further by potentially giving the government freer rein to arrest…

EU Internet Censorship Will Censor the Whole World’s Internet

As the EU advances the new Copyright Directive towards becoming law in its 28 member-states, it’s important to realise that the EU’s plan will end up censoring the Internet for everyone, not just Europeans. A quick refresher: Under Article 13 of the new Copyright Directive,…

Chicago Should Reject a Proposal for Private-Sector Face Surveillance

A proposed amendment to the Chicago municipal code would allow businesses to use face surveillance systems that could invade biometric and location privacy, and violate a pioneering state privacy law adopted by Illinois a decade ago. EFF joined a letter with several allied privacy organizations…

What’s Next For Europe’s Internet Censorship Plan?

Last month, a key European vote brought the EU much closer to a system of universal mass censorship and surveillance, in the name of defending copyright. Members of the EU Parliament voted to advance the new Copyright Directive, even though it contained two extreme and…

Victory! Dangerous Elements Removed From California’s Bot-Labeling Bill

Governor Jerry Brown recently signed S.B. 1001, a new law requiring all “bots” used for purposes of influencing a commercial transaction or a vote in an election to be labeled. The bill, introduced by Senator Robert Hertzberg, originally included a provision that would have been…

New North American Trade Deal Has Bad News for Canadian Copyright

Earlier this week, the U.S. Trade Representative announced a replacement deal for the North American Free Trade Agreement, the nearly 25-year-old trade deal between the U.S., Mexico, and Canada. Amid the long list of tariff-free products and restriction-free cheese names [PDF] in the new trade…

Privacy Badger Now Fights More Sneaky Google Tracking

With its latest update, Privacy Badger now fights “link tracking” in a number of Google products. Link tracking allows a company to follow you whenever you click on a link to leave its website. Earlier this year, EFF rolled out a Privacy Badger update targeting Facebook’s use…

There are Many Problems With Mobile Privacy but the Presidential Alert Isn’t One of Them

On Wednesday, most cell phones in the US received a jarring alert at the same time. This was a test of the Wireless Emergency Alert (WEA) system, also commonly known as the Presidential Alert. This is an unblockable nationwide alert system which is operated by…